Mini Q+A with Mary Beth Barone

Mary Beth Barone is a Manhattan-based comedian, writer, and actor. She was recently named one of Comedy Central’s Up Next and performed at their Clusterfest showcase in June 2019. Mary Beth can be seen hosting her monthly stand-up show at Peppi’s Cellar with Benito Skinner or at PUBLIC hotel in New York City, where she has a stand-up residency. She also hosts Drag His Ass: A F*ckboy Treatment Program, a show she feels very strongly about. Mary Beth currently hosts/produces the podcast Mildly Offensive. Check out her upcoming appearances here, and follow her!


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

Can you shut up?

Describe your worst gig.

I did survive a terrible set in Bushwick. The host brought me up as “the person who caused 9/11” and then the microphone broke in the middle of my set. I bombed HARD!

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Do the work, speak your truth, and f*ck everything else!

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

The unconditional support of my friends and family.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Try to learn one thing from every performance.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

A random audience member once followed me outside of a club after my set to tell me he really enjoyed my comedy but then proceeded to give me notes on some of my jokes. He said “you should be writing this down.” Mhm sure thing.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

I love it except when I’m the only girl on a lineup and I need a hair-tie.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

We don’t use that word in my house 🙂

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

Flirting is easier now to be honest! It’s always been good to bring a levity to certain situations but I’ve definitely had many moments of putting my foot in my mouth.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Get a great tape you are proud of and don’t be shy about sharing it.

What single word always cracks you up?

Smegma. I’m disgusting.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

My journey in comedy started because of a few different people and circumstances. Watching Broad City inspired me to take improv at UCB and watching Inside Amy Schumer was the kick I needed to try stand-up. So I guess you could say without Comedy Central, I wouldn’t be here!


Mary Beth Barone is a Manhattan-based comedian, writer, and actor. She was recently named one of Comedy Central’s Up Next and performed at their Clusterfest showcase in June 2019. Mary Beth can be seen hosting her monthly stand-up show at Peppi’s Cellar with Benito Skinner or at PUBLIC hotel in New York City, where she has a stand-up residency. She also hosts Drag His Ass: A F*ckboy Treatment Program, a show she feels very strongly about. Mary Beth currently hosts/produces the podcast Mildly Offensive. Check out her upcoming appearances here, and follow her!

Mini Q+A with Lauren Ashcraft

Lauren Ashcraft is a Democratic Socialist comedian running for Congress in NY-12.

She went to comedy school and started to perform standup comedy throughout the city as a hobby.  In 2016 after wanting to create a safe place for comedians to practice their craft, she began to produce comedy shows.  Later that same year she planned a celebration show for the weekend following the 2016 presidential election, and when that did not go as planned, she decided to turn the show into a fundraiser for Planned Parenthood in an effort to combat a feeling of hopelessness. Lauren continued to plan free monthly charitable comedy shows, aptly named “Collection Box Comedy,” at which she would showcase diverse comedic talent and collect optional donations from attendees for various 501(c)3 organizations she is passionate about.  Learn more about Lauren here! Follow her here!

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

I always invite them to my upcoming fundraisers or send my donation link (I am running for Congress!).

Describe your worst gig.

I performed to an audience of 1 in a club at the very beginning of my career. The person was weirded out too so was reading a book as I was performing so as to not make eye contact. I powered through and probably have not been the same human since.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Bringer shows are scams

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Comedy is where I made all of my best friends in this city. It also became my social life, my activism, and my outlet. Leaving comedy would have meant leaving all of that.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

“Keep your awkward delivery” which is a great relief, cause that’s… just me.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Literally every piece of advice that a non-comedian has ever given to me, especially when they interchange standup comedy and improve.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

The community of women and LGBTQIA+ comedians has been AMAZING and empowering to be part of. It fortunately and unfortunately a bonding experience to navigate industry together and stand behind one other.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

Gender is a spectrum. Let’s keep it comedian for all.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I have anxiety and also social anxiety. The first time I got on stage I was shaking. Then I started forcing myself to go to more open mics and eventually started producing my own shows. Now look at me; I’m running for Congress!

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Produce your own shows, fill them with amazing people, perform along side them and practice, network, repeat

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

If so, who, why, how?I was always so excited to turn on Kathy Griffin throughout my childhood, and am a storyteller myself, so I cannot say she didn’t inspire me!

What word always cracks you up?

GESCHIRRSPÜLER which means washing machine in German?

Mini Q+A with Danielle Perez

Danielle Perez is a stand-up comedian, writer, and actress best known as the woman in a wheelchair, with no feet, who won a treadmill on The Price Is Right. She appeared as a guest on Jimmy Kimmel Live for her hilarious reaction to winning the awkward prize. A founding member of Thigh Gap Comedy, Danielle produces live comedy shows with fellow bad bitches Madison Shepard and Danielle Radford. Together they host GENTRIFICATION, a popular, monthly, diversity showcase at Avenue 50 Studio, in her hometown neighborhood of Highland Park. Follow Danielle here! Check out her upcoming shows here!

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Don’t wait around for other people to book you or put you on. Find your coven, make your own shit, and support the fuck out of each other. Create your own spaces, share opportunities, and lift up those behind you as you come up.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

Damn, it must suck to have no sense of humor or taste

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Never trust a comic who doesn’t bomb.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I was out at brunch with friends. The server took our order, then returned to the table and said “the manager is sending over a complimentary flight of sweet waffles because they saw you perform last night you were really funny.” I love when strangers to, I love free waffles! Savor the wins and own complements!

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Never do bringers. A good set is your best audition. When you consistently start doing well at open mics, people will book you. Once you start getting booked, tape all your sets. Once you have a great tape, go to shows, introduce yourself to the bookers, and ask them for the best way to submit.

Danielle Perez is a stand-up comedian, writer, and actress best known as the woman in a wheelchair, with no feet, who won a treadmill on The Price Is Right. She appeared as a guest on Jimmy Kimmel Live for her hilarious reaction to winning the awkward prize. A founding member of Thigh Gap Comedy, Danielle produces live comedy shows with fellow bad bitches Madison Shepard and Danielle Radford. Together they host GENTRIFICATION, a popular, monthly, diversity showcase at Avenue 50 Studio, in her hometown neighborhood of Highland Park.

Follow Danielle here! Check out her upcoming shows here!

Mini Q+A with Atheer Yacoub

Atheer Yacoub is a New York based comedian, writer, and podcaster. Her comedy is inspired by her Palestinian-Muslim upbringing in Alabama. Atheer has appeared on Gotham Comedy Live, and is also a writer for The Breakdown with Mehdi Barakchian and Passport control with Mehdi Barakchian. Along with Leila Barghouty, Atheer co-hosts The No Fly List Podcast which features funny conversations with other brown comedians, artists, and interesting people. Check out where you can see Atheer live and follow her!

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

I usually like to shut them down by putting them on the spot.

Describe your worst gig.

When I first started out, I did a show for a Muslim charity during Ramadan and I went up right as the food was coming out and people were starving and waiting to break their fast and no one was paying attention to me, which is totally understandable. I was the only thing standing between them and a huge buffet after an 18 hour fast and I can’t compete with carbs. My 30 min set ended up getting cut short because the sun went down and it was time to break the fast, which I was perfectly okay with, considering how it was going.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Talk about things that matter to you and have a unique point of view. Don’t pander or cater to anyone. Do jokes that are true to who you are you will build an audience who appreciates your humor. Just make sure to present it in a way that’s relatable.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

My immediate thought is “that person is ignorant and has probably never seen women do comedy.”

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Having good comedian friends to go to open mics with and people I can write with helped me feel like I wasn’t completely on my own. It’s also really important to surround yourself with positive people as comedians can get really jaded and negativity is contagious.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t compare yourself or career to anyone else and be patient. Don’t worry about what shows or things everybody else is getting, because everyone has a unique path. Just focus on becoming the funniest version of yourself. Keep your head down and work hard and it will pay off.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

I’ve gotten comedy mansplained to so many times by open mic male comedians who think they know best. Worst advice is probably not to talk about my culture or ethnic background, which is a huge part of who I am.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Being a woman in comedy is constantly having to answer the question “what’s it like to be a woman in comedy?”

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

Yuck! It feels like an unnecessary distinction, as if the word comedian or comic defaults to males. I think the word comedian should be universal.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I think having a good sense of humor helps me not take life too seriously and keep things in perspective. It’s also a great way to connect with people and help break down barriers. I’d also be lying if I didn’t say it also serves as a coping and defense mechanism.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Be your funniest self at open mics and treat it like a show. People who run shows will be there and see how funny you are and ask you to be on their shows. Apply to festivals, contact bookers, and have a tight 5 min tape you can send them.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

There was really no one person, but I grew up watching old sitcoms like I Love Lucy and Mary Tyler Moore. I think seeing strong, funny women, going against the grain helped me realize that it was a possibility to become a comedian myself. As a grew older, I started watching Sarah Silverman who I think is wonderful and hysterical.


Atheer Yacoub is a New York based comedian, writer, and podcaster. Her comedy is inspired by her Palestinian-Muslim upbringing in Alabama. Atheer has appeared on Gotham Comedy Live, and is also a writer for The Breakdown with Mehdi Barakchian and Passport control with Mehdi Barakchian. Along with Leila Barghouty, Atheer co-hosts The No Fly List Podcast which features funny conversations with other brown comedians, artists, and interesting people. Check out where you can see Atheer live and follow her!

How to get a job as a (TV) writer and comedian

Alison Leiby is a comedian (Bridgetown Comedy Festival) and writer on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Prior to writing for your fave comedy, she contributed to The President Show, The Opposition, and Triumph. Alison will be performing at Ladies who Laugh comedy fundraiser Tuesday, July 30. Get tickets here. Follow her!

Photo via: Alexandra Genova


What’s your job/job title?

Writer and Comedian

Did you always want to do this job?

Once I learned being a writer was actually a job, I knew one day I would do it. Before I knew it was a job I think I wanted to be like, a fashion designer/dolphin trainer hybrid.

What do you love most about your job?

I get to watch TV when I’m home and call it “research.”

What skills are the most important to have for it?

Creativity, flexibility, ability to live off of snacks for most of the year.

Are they skills that can be developed in other jobs?

Depends on the snack situation, but overall yes.

What is most challenging about your job?

Getting writer’s block when you’re in the office and not being able to go to Nordstrom Rack and browse for an hour to get through it, which is my cure when I’m working at home.

What, if any, are the particular challenges in your job related to your being outside the straight-white-dude norm? BONUS: How do you manage or overcome them?

It’s nice to realize that every year I notice those challenges less and less. I don’t know if that’s the world changing for the better, but I hope it is. There will always be jobs or shows or situations where straight-white-dudes will say they don’t “get” the jokes you’re making or they don’t think that reality shows or makeup tutorials or romance novels are worth making comedy about. You just have to know that they are extremely wrong about that and keep making the kind of comedy and writing the kind of things you think are funny. And if those things are “female” in nature or whatever, all the better. Oh, I also make a point of mentioning when my sick days are for my period cramps because it’s time everyone acknowledges what a nightmare that is (and very valid illness!).

What is the most important thing a teen or young job-seeker can do if they want YOUR JOB?

If you want to write, specifically comedy, it’s a skill like any other, so the more you do it, the better you become. Try and write something every day, even if you think it’s not good, it’s making you good. Also read, watch, and engage with as much of the world as you can. The more you know about the world, the more interesting things you’ll have to say about it in your work for the rest of your life. Also, don’t wait for someone to give you permission to write, just start writing (or performing, same rules apply)


Alison Leiby is a comedian (Bridgetown Comedy Festival) and writer on The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. Prior to writing for your fave comedy, she contributed to The President Show, The Opposition, and Triumph. Alison will be performing at Ladies who Laugh comedy fundraiser Tuesday, July 30. Get tickets here. Follow her!

Read Cassandra’s bio here.

Mini Q+A with Karen Chee

Karen Chee is a Brooklyn-based comedian and writer for Late Night with Seth Meyers. Karen’s TV writing credits include the 2019 Golden Globe Awards and the upcoming Reductress pilot on Comedy Central. Karen contributes regularly to The New Yorker and has been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, McSweeney’s, and more. Catch Karen’s upcoming shows + follow!

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

Aw, there are so many better things you could be doing with your time. Bowling, soccer, pottery. Maybe try one of those instead?

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Lots of supportive friends and encouraging strangers and really enjoying the work.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Go with your gut. Do what you think is funny! Never punch down.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

It’s like being a woman anywhere–it’s hard and it sucks and it’s also somehow the best.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

lol


Karen Chee is a Brooklyn-based comedian and writer for Late Night with Seth Meyers. Karen’s TV writing credits include the 2019 Golden Globe Awards and the upcoming Reductress pilot on Comedy Central. Karen contributes regularly to The New Yorker and has been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, McSweeney’s, and more. Catch Karen’s upcoming shows + follow!

Mini Q+A with Kate Robards

Kate Robards is an award-winning writer and performer based in New York City. Kate’s play trilogy Mandarin Orange, Ain’t That Rich, and PolySHAMory have racked up awards and performances across the country and abroad. Kate is a graduate of UCB improv and the one-year professional acting program at The Barrow Group.  She performs stand up and improv regularly in New York City, and has a standup series called Strawberry Milk. It’s just as good as it sounds.

Buy tickets to the monthly Strawberry Milk: A Standup Comedy Show on 7/26 here!


What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics to actual spots?

Start your own show and book the people you love the most! Know that there is no right or wrong path to making your way in comedy. It is just sticking with it!

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young female comedian?

Allow yourself to change, always.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Lauren Weedman. Even though she doesn’t identify as just a comedian, she’s a performer, writer, actors and she’s hilarious. I saw her solo show BUST at Studio Theatre years ago and was blown away by her work. The comedy and drama of it all made me say, I want to do that. Plus she’d written this hilarious book “A Woman Trapped in a Woman’s Body.” I was and continue to be in awe of her and her work.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life?

I waited tables and worked in restaurants in high school and undergrad. I was literally using my personality and jokes for tips.

Favorite response to “What’s it like to be a woman in comedy”?

Fun! I’ve found strength in my fellow female comedians. I have started two female helmed comedy shows in NYC. I love it!

Describe your worst gig.

I’ve bombed a lot. I don’t beat myself up about it and instead I just celebrate every time I get on stage. I constantly remind myself ART AIN’T FOR THE FAINT OF HEART. Yes, comedy is art.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Trust your instinct. Your jokes may not work initially but don’t abandon them. Tweak your premise and see how you can get the audience. Trust yourself.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

You should wear sweatshirts. Don’t dress like you dress because women won’t laugh at you because they’ll be jealous that their date wants you not them. Of course this was from a male comedy club owner.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

I’m still coming up, but my most essential trick to stick with comedy is to surround myself with good, kind people who believe in me and encourage me. This is crucial. There are some people who don’t get it. You can love them, but put your blinders on to negativity. My mom wrote me an inspiring email that has become a mantra after I was a finalist for Sundance Episodic Lab but was ultimately rejected. I have it memorized. The subject was- Keep on truckin’ The body of the email just said, “You are strong and work hard. You are in a business that does not necessarily reward being good. Much of it is based on luck, a twist of fate, or something strange that cannot be planned. Keep on going. Adjust when you need to. Remember to be kind to yourself a well as others. Love you”

Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

Thanks for listening, contributing, coming. If you want me to work with you on your performance, I do coach aspiring comics and performers. Hit me up after!


Kate Robards is an award-winning writer and performer based in New York City. Kate’s play trilogy Mandarin Orange, Ain’t That Rich, and PolySHAMory have racked up awards and performances across the country and abroad. Kate is a graduate of UCB improv and the one-year professional acting program at The Barrow Group.  She performs stand up and improv regularly in New York City. She performs a monthly standup series called Strawberry Milk. Buy tickets to the monthly Strawberry Milk: A Standup Comedy Show on 7/26 here.

Mini Q+A with Brittani Nichols

Brittani Nichols is a writer, comedian, and actor living in Los Angeles. Words With Girls, a comedy pilot (based on the web series of the same name) that she created and starred in, was produced as part of Issa Rae’s Color Creative TV and premiered at HBO/BET’s Urbanworld Film Festival. She co-hosts Brand New Podcast with fellow witch and comedian Ariana Lenarsky. Suicide Kale, the feature she produced, wrote, and starred in, is currently available on SVOD after winning numerous awards including the Audience Award at Outfest and Newfest. Brittani has appeared on Transparent and Take My Wife and her writing credits include StrangersTake My Wife, MTV’s VMA’s and the celebrity rap battle show Drop the Mic. Brittani is currently writing for the recently announced A Black Lady Sketch Show for HBO.


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

You’re boring.

Describe your worst gig.

Every gig is terrible because I’d rather be at home.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian? 

Get comfortable with the discomfort of saying no to things.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”? 

I live a life in which I avoid this scenario.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

My friends coming to shows. If you’re not funny, and your friends have self-respect, they will not repeatedly come watch you be unfunny.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

All you need is a beginning, middle, and end.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

You should be able to make everyone laugh.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

I’ve used humor as a comping mechanism since before I knew what a coping mechanism was. Being able to talk about things via jokes before I was in a place where I was willing to be vulnerable enough to talk about them plainly helped me make sense of myself, the world around me, and the things that happened to me.

What single word always cracks you up?

Whilst

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

I don’t know that there was a period between wanting to be a comedian and becoming one. It was just the decision of, “Oh, this is what I’m doing now.” But Dave Chappelle was the reason I became invested in comedy and appreciated every aspect of it before I decided it’s what I would do.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

The only people I see use that word are men trying to be funny by putting it in their Twitter bios.

Photo via: Robin Roemer


Brittani Nichols is a writer, comedian, and actor living in Los Angeles. Words With Girls, a comedy pilot (based on the web series of the same name) that she created and starred in, was produced as part of Issa Rae’s Color Creative TV and premiered at HBO/BET’s Urbanworld Film Festival. She co-hosts Brand New Podcast with fellow witch and comedian Ariana Lenarsky. Suicide Kale, the feature she produced, wrote, and starred in, is currently available on SVOD after winning numerous awards including the Audience Award at Outfest and Newfest. Brittani has appeared on Transparent and Take My Wife and her writing credits include StrangersTake My Wife, MTV’s VMA’s and the celebrity rap battle show Drop the Mic. Brittani is currently writing for the recently announced A Black Lady Sketch Show for HBO.

Read Lynn’s bio here.

Mini Q+A with Emily Winter

Emily Winter has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, NPR’s “Ask Me Another,” TV Land, Fusion TV, Glamour, and The Barnes & Noble Review. She’s an NBC Late Night Writers Workshop script judge, and co-creator of WHAT A JOKE, a nationwide comedy festival that raised more than $50K for the ACLU in 2017. Emily’s standup has been featured on SiriusXM, and she’s performed at SF SketchFest, Laughing Skull Comedy Festival, The Limestone Comedy Festival, and others. She runs two Time Out Critics’ Pick comedy shows in Brooklyn: BackFat Variety and Side Ponytail, and hosts a podcast that reached #1 in Podomatic training podcasts, HOW TO PRODUCE LIVE COMEDY. Her work has been profiled on The TODAY Show, The AV Club, Buzzfeed, Lifehacker, The Miami New Times, Bustle, someecards, The Boston Globe and others.


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

When I was still pretty new in comedy, I told a bad male heckler, “You’re so hot. Too bad you’re an a**hole.” The room lit up, and I was really proud of myself because I still was insecure on stage. That moment gave me a lot of confidence.

Describe your worst gig.

I was once bumped from a show in Miami because a person in a rabbit costume wanted to do spoken word. That hurt.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Be kind, but do what you want.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Life without standup comedy felt a little bit like I was floating through New York City, desperate for meaning, attention, and purpose. Standup comedy changed all that. It gave me goals and a very concrete reason to get up, get out, and work.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Punch up, not down.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t wear dresses. (I’ll wear what I want!)

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It got me a job once! I made my former boss, a book packager, laugh during my interview, and he said he hired me to come up with book ideas because he liked my sense of humor.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Just keep plugging away. I know it’s so hard to hear. But when you get better, unfortunately YOU’LL be the first to notice. It’ll take some time for the rest of the world to catch on. So keep writing new jokes and weaving them into tried and true material to broaden your set while also showcasing your skills.

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

I wrote my first standup joke after enduring a physical assault. I’d always wanted to try standup, but I never NEEDED to try it until I was depressed and desperate for an outlet for my sadness, rage, and my joke about it all. I’m not glad that the assault happened, but I’m glad I made lemons into lemonade.


Emily Winter has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, NPR’s “Ask Me Another,” TV Land, Fusion TV, Glamour, and The Barnes & Noble Review. She’s an NBC Late Night Writers Workshop script judge, and co-creator of WHAT A JOKE, a nationwide comedy festival that raised more than $50K for the ACLU in 2017. Emily’s standup has been featured on SiriusXM, and she’s performed at SF SketchFest, Laughing Skull Comedy Festival, The Limestone Comedy Festival, and others. She runs two Time Out Critics’ Pick comedy shows in Brooklyn: BackFat Variety and Side Ponytail, and hosts a podcast that reached #1 in Podomatic training podcasts, HOW TO PRODUCE LIVE COMEDY. Her work has been profiled on The TODAY Show, The AV Club, Buzzfeed, Lifehacker, The Miami New Times, Bustle, someecards, The Boston Globe and others.

Photo credit: Phil Provencio

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Read Cassandra’s bio here. 

Mini Q+A with Lolita Morrow

Lolita Morrow is an up-and-coming New York based comedian who grew up in Houston, Texas. She’s performed at New York’s famous Caroline’s on Broadway and Broadway Comedy Club. Lolita’s southern charm and quick wit has allowed her to host red carpets and moderate panel events around the country. Her new comedy book, Think Like A Bartender –Cocktails For Life, will be released this fall.


On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young (female/LGBTQI) comedian?

One size does not fit all….not for pantyhose or comedy. Be Yourself!

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

The constant, persistent pressure from bill collectors. That’ll get you going!

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Do it for free.. it will pay for itself later.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

See previous answer.

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

When my grandfather kept hitting on my girlfriends…I had to laugh to keep from choking him out.

What single word always cracks you up?

Covfefe

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian? If so, who, why, how?

My grandmother! She was always laughing at everything I did…. well, now I know it was because of her dementia.


Lolita Morrow is an up-and-coming New York based comedian who grew up in Houston, Texas. She’s performed at New York’s famous Caroline’s on Broadway and Broadway Comedy Club. Lolita’s southern charm and quick wit has allowed her to host red carpets and moderate panel events around the country. Her new comedy book, Think Like A Bartender –Cocktails For Life, will be released this fall.

Read Cassandra’s bio here.