Mini Q+A with Jaye McBride

Jaye McBride is funny, smart and proudly transgender. Jaye has traveled the world performing stand-up comedy. Jaye has been a part of The Boston Comedy Festival, The Maine Comedy Festival and the She Devil Comedy Festival. In addition to stand-up, Jaye has written, produced and acted in a variety of short films. When not performing on-stage or on-screen Jaye writes “The Comedy Blog” for the Times Union and speaks at colleges all across the country with her lecture about being transgender.


Favorite response to a heckler or troll?

If it’s a guy, I hit on him. Nothing funnier than watching a bro squirm from getting hit on by a tranny comedian. That guy won’t laugh but everyone else will.

Describe your worst gig.

One of my first road gigs was in Pottsville, PA. It was a four-hour drive and when we finally got into town, we decided to hit a strip mall to use the bathroom and eat something. The very first person I saw (Pottsvillian?) had a giant swastika tattoo on his forearm. I looked at the other guys and just said, “I’ll be in the car.”

How has being funny helped you in your offstage life, either recently or when you were younger?

It’s such a great defense mechanism. If you can make a high school bully laugh, he might not shove you into a locker. And if he does, at least you can still crack yourself up about it.

On your deathbed, what transcendent advice would you croak at a young comedian?

Be nice That sounds corny, especially since I’m usually the most miserable person in any room. (The mention of ‘deathbed’ makes me feel warm and fuzzy. Literally, it’s on my vision board as ‘the sweet release only death will bring’.) If you’re a dick, you won’t get brought back to many shows so be nice.

What’s your first impulse when someone says “women aren’t funny”?

To drop an anvil on his head. The truth is when someone says that, they’re really saying, “I refuse to believe women are funny and won’t give you a chance.” Fuck him, I don’t have to prove shit to that asshole.

When you were coming up in comedy, what helped you stick with it?

Having nothing else in my life. Pathetic, I know.

Best comedy advice you ever got?

Literally everything Gary Gulman has ever tweeted.

Worst comedy advice you ever got?

Don’t talk about being trans.

What advice do you have for how to level up from open mics + bringers to actual SPOT-spots?

Network! Just hang out with other comics because people book comics they know. And if you’re hanging out and still not getting booked, produce your own show and make them come to you.

Feelings about the word “comedienne”?

It makes me want to vomette in my toilette because of the irritationne.

What single word always cracks you up?

Fart. (Mine, not yours)

Was there one person who inspired you to become a comedian?

Jake Johannsen. I saw him on Letterman years ago when I was a kid and just knew I wanted to be like him. Well, professionally, not anatomically

photo via Jaye McBride


Jaye McBride is funny, smart and proudly transgender. Jaye has traveled the world performing stand-up comedy. Jaye has been a part of The Boston Comedy Festival, The Maine Comedy Festival and the She Devil Comedy Festival. In addition to stand-up, Jaye has written, produced and acted in a variety of short films. When not performing on-stage or on-screen Jaye writes “The Comedy Blog” for the Times Union and speaks at colleges all across the country with her lecture about being transgender.